Team 17 Teamed Up With Yooka Laylee Developer Playtonic Games


Team 17, known for Worms, has announced a partnership with indie developer Playtonic Games assisting the studio publish their Kickstarter success Yooka Laylee. 

The 3D platformer earned over £2 million through crowd-funding and is the spiritual successor to Banjo Kazooie, being developed by former Rare employees.

Creative Lead at Playtonic games, Gavin Price, has said that he they’d only welcome a partner that could improve the creation of the game whilst respecting the independence of the developer team.

“Team17’s 25-year industry-leading expertise will significantly benefit Yooka Laylee in a myriad of ways,” said Price. “Working alongside such a strong partner will allow the Playtonic team to focus 100% of our efforts on building the best possible version of Yooka-Laylee for backers and new fans alike.”

Team 17’s Managing Director, Debbie Bestwick, said they have a deep respect for the Playtonic team and that the team have worked on a lot of titles that are close to Team 17’s heart.

“We’ve been following their Kickstarter campaign with interest and are delighted to welcome them onto our label and into the Team17 family,” said Bestwick. “I can’t wait to start working together on this great game and hope this is the start of a long term partnership between Team17 and Playtonic.”

Yooka Laylee is planned to release in October 2016 on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Wii U and PC.

Fret Ye Not PS4 And PC Owners, Rise Of The Tomb Raider Will Appear In 2016


Square Enix today announced its latest title in the critically acclaimed and award-winning Tomb Raider series, Rise of the Tomb Raider, will be available for Windows 10 and Steam in Early 2016. The game will be a console exclusive to Xbox One and Xbox 360 for one year after its initial launch, coming to PlayStation 4 in Holiday 2016. Renowned developer Crystal Dynamics is leading development in the latest entry in the iconic series for additional platforms.

In the critically acclaimed Tomb Raider, Lara Croft survived a harrowing experience only to be discredited as part of a cover up. Now, after uncovering an ancient mystery, Lara must explore the most treacherous and remote regions of Siberia to find the secret of immortality before a ruthless organization known as Trinity. Lara must use her wits and survival skills, form new alliances, and ultimately embrace her destiny as the Tomb Raider.

Experience high-octane action moments, conquer beautifully hostile environments, engage in brutal guerrilla combat, and explore awe-inspiring deadly tombs in the evolution of survival action. In Rise of the Tomb Raider, Lara becomes more than a survivor as she embarks on her first great Tomb Raiding expedition.

Rise of the Tomb Raider will premiere first, exclusively on Xbox One and Xbox 360 on 10 November 2015.

Bethesda Bringing All Fallout Games In The Series Inside One Nuke Bomb


Bethesda were pleased to announce Fallout Anthology, the definitive PC collection from the award-winning Fallout series, will be releasing on 2 October 2015 for AU$99.95. Fallout Anthology will be featuring five critically acclaimed games and official add-ons in a premium collectible set, with a space reserved to add your copy of Fallout 4. This ultimate collectible is packaged together in an exclusive mini-nuke storage case with audible bomb sound.

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This Fallout collection will include:

  • Fallout 3: Game of the Year Edition (The Pitt, Operation: Anchorage, Broken Steel, Point Lookout, Mothership Zeta)
  • Fallout: New Vegas Ultimate Edition (Dead Money, Honest Hearts, Old World Blues, Lonesome Road, Gun Runners’ Arsenal, Courier’s Stash)
  • Fallout Tactics
  • Fallout 2
  • Fallout

Hearthstone: The Grand Tournament Expansion Announced


The fourth major card expansion has been announced for Hearthstone, titled ‘the Grand Tournament’. There will be 132 new cards, which are all obtainable in the same way Goblins vs. Gnomes were, through real cash or in-game gold, and will feature a new Gameplay mechanic called ‘Inspire’.

‘Inspire’ is triggered when you use your classes hero power while a minion with the ‘inspire’ power is on the board, and has a range of effects, such as ‘Inspire: Gain +1 attack’, or ‘Inspire: Add a random spell to your hand’. The potential for random fun and overpowering decks already looks great, and I can’t wait to get my hands on some of the new cards.

Check out what Blizzard has to say about it’s newest expansion:

When the Lich King and his undead Scourge threatened the world, the Argent Crusade called upon Azeroth’s mightiest heroes to prove their mettle in a magnificent tournament. Knights of all races flocked to Northrend, vying for glory in epic battles against fearsome monsters. Though the Lich King’s evil has been vanquished, the Grand Tournament continues… the competitive atmosphere’s just a bit more playful than it used to be.

And why shouldn’t the show go on? Would-be champions are arriving in droves from all over the world, hankering to prove their worth and claim the honor of flying their colors in the name of victory!

Who will be the victor of The Grand Tournament? You and your friends, of course!

The Grand Tournament is set to be released next month, though you are start pre-buying card packs next week via gold or money.

OXCGN’s Puzzle & Dragons Z and Puzzle & Dragons Super Mario Bros. Edition Review


Puzzle & Dragons is a puzzle game with elements from RPGs and strategy games. It originally was released for smartphones and tablets but now Nintendo has bundled up two versions of the game – Puzzle & Dragons Z and Puzzle & Dragons Super Mario Bros. Edition onto one DS card.

Puzzle & Dragons has you fighting monsters in various levels by matching orbs of the same colour. On your touch screen there’s a grid filled with orbs of which can be coloured either red, blue, green, pink, yellow or purple and if you can match three or more of these colours in a row you successfully attack your foes. Now it all sounds simple enough but there is a rich strategy to this puzzle formula that will have you mulling over battles always thinking about your next move.

Each colour represents an element and if you don’t have a monster in play that is of this element, matching those coloured orbs are useless. It does absolutely nothing. There also is the fact that certain elements are susceptible to particular elements and building up combos or clearing as many orbs as you can in one-turn raises the power you unleash against your opponents. Luckily the game warns you before you go into a fight about what elements will be in play so you can select your team and level up characters most useful for the next battle. There also are many, many different types of monsters that can evolve in different and unique ways and it can be quite a daunting task actually choosing who will fight with you.

Out of the two versions I enjoyed the Mario edition much more because it lets you go straight into the fight without churning through a tonne of stale dialogue and useless story bits and pieces that force you to yawn. The Mario edition just has you making your way across a map similar to other Super Mario Bros. games and clearing each bit until you defeat the boss. Also Peach has been kidnapped again because apparently this seems like the only motivation for Mario to actually go up against Bowser. Very creative…

Puzzle & Dragons Z takes more of a Pokemon approach to the story, having you start out as a beginner exploring and training your dragons to become the top dog. This version has more to do within the game’s world but it isn’t necessary and the Mario version does a fine job in just feeding you the gameplay.

Overall Puzzle & Dragons is a fun game and it can suck you up, making you go through each and every level trying to dominate your opponents but it is just a puzzle game that has a bit of a short lifespan. It’s great in short sessions – maybe if you catch public transport or need to unwind just before a class – but I doubt anyone will find that much enjoyment playing this for hours and hours in one sitting. Puzzle & Dragons works well on the platform and is a great game to kill time with.

TL;DR

Puzzle & Dragons Z and Puzzle & Dragons Super Mario Bros. Edition is a puzzle game that has you matching orbs of the same colour into a line of three or more that in results makes your monster attack your foes. There are two versions of the puzzle game included in this pack and it has rich strategy and is great for short sessions.

Pros:

+ Rich strategy before and during the battles

+ Great fun in mini-sessions

+ Plenlty of monster to choose from

Cons:

– Short Life-span

Puzzle & Dragons Z has boring dialogue

7/10

This 3DS review was conducted by a physical copy provided by Nintendo Australia. 

August Games With Gold Titles Leak?


It is always good to catch up on games you’ve always wanted to play with free titles on Xbox One and Xbox 360 that Xbox’s Games with Gold is offering. Looks like the lineup of Xbox games that Gold members will be receiving in August have apparently leaked. Posts on Reddit and 4chan showcase an image of the leaked games, being Rise: Son of Rome Legendary Edition and Slash Dash on Xbox One, and Catherine and Fallout: New Vegas on Xbox 360.
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On the Xbox One, Rise: Son of Rome was lauded as a fantastic game that was light on content but fun to play, and Slash Dash came out recently making a free release feel quite strange. Catherine, an anime style puzzle game, has been placed on several ‘best of last generation’ lists, as well as Fallout: New Vegas, which offers hundreds of hours of content in a dystopian and hostile environment for you to explore to your hearts desire.
I’ll let you decide if you think this leak is real or not, but in my opinion it could go either way: PlayStation Plus regularly has fantastic games release for free, even on launch in the case of smaller, indie titles, but it is rarely the ‘Legendary Edition’ that is handed to consumers.
What do you think? Let us know on twitter at @OXCGN, or comment below.

OXCGN’s Batman: Arkham Knight Review


To say that I had high expectations for Batman: Arkham Knight would be an understatement. The Arkham series is one of my favourite franchises, and after having platinumed both Asylum and City (I would have platinumed Origins as well had there not been online trophies) I felt prepared to take on the Dark Knight’s final chapter. Arkham Knight is one of the prettiest, most enjoyable games to play that has thus far appeared on the next-gen consoles, and offers perhaps the tightest gameplay in a series renowned for exactly that. However, some odd story choices and lack of challenge maps hurt the overall product, as well as a number of audio and visual glitches that hampered my time with the game. I will note that I played the digital version of the game on PS4 which may have affected how the game plays when compared to the game reading from a physical disc – keep that in mind if you are considering downloading from the PlayStation Store. Since the game has been out for a week or so now, I am not going to shy away from spoilers when discussing story content, though I will relegate that section to the end of the review so that those who do not want anything spoiled for them can read my thoughts on the rest of the game. I will clearly mark when spoilers begin. That said, let’s dive in.

The Arkham series is known for it’s tight and fluid gameplay, and that legacy continues in Arkham Knight, with both Combat and Predator sections receiving just enough new kinks to totally change the experience while remaining incredibly familiar to anyone who has played the previous games. New gadgets, such as the ability to order guards to perform a specific action by mimicking the voice of their leader through a voice shifter, really change up the freedom of Predator encounters – though I still found myself relying on silent takedowns more than anything else.

The new fear-takedown mechanic is a massive addition, as you can instantly incapacitate between 3-5 guards (depending on how you have levelled up the skill) which can completely shift the balance of power in a room filled with armed enemies. It can be a bit difficult to activate, and alerts all other guards to your position. However, it balances the immediate threat with this new mechanic by overpowering the others Batman has at his disposal.

Combat is fantastic, with a multitude of new enemy types appearing for the first time in the series which totally change the balance of fights. Medics can revive fallen comrades, and can give other thugs an electric charge which makes them harmful to attack unless taken down in a specific way. Huge, bulking enemies laugh off your attacks, becoming imposing threats on the battlefield which beg to be defeated last, since they can only be attacked while leaving yourself open.

When a number of these new additions appears in a single fight, the combat becomes less about attacking everything until it is unconscious, and more about ‘which order do I need to defeat these guys in’. It’s an awesome addition, and one that left me defeated in a number of combat scenarios despite 3-starring every combat challenge in the previous games.

Yet, there is a third main pillar of gameplay introduced in Knight that doesn’t hold up nearly as well: The Batmobile.

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Over all, I think the way the Batmobile handles is totally awesome. Zipping through the dark, dank streets of Gotham in a jet black car-tank is something I wouldn’t trade for the world, but Rocksteady seemed to be a little overexcited by the car’s inclusion. There are an absurd amount of tank battle missions in the game, with most (if not all) of the large scale boss fights being some variation on Batmobile vs. Drone Tanks. It’s a shame, considering how good the boss fights have traditionally been in the previous games in the series, that they were done away with in this game. There are a few supervillains that appear who would have lent themselves to awesome one-on-one fist fights, but instead are relegated to stealth-tank fights (which barely makes sense in the first place). It’s a huge missed opportunity – both in that it forces the Batmobile on you and doesn’t capitalize on the strengths of the villains.

The PC version of Arkham Knight has received a lot of flack over the last week, with it launching in an almost unplayable state, and while the PS4 version is definitely head and shoulders above the PC version, I still managed to run into some problems. While soaring around the city, my audio would cut out unexpectedly for about a second, before coming back – not the end of the world, but frustrating. Then, during big tank battles with a lot of explosions and particles my frame rate would drop – again, frustrating considering how often tank battles would appear, but certainly not game breaking.

The biggest problem I ran into was a key character model simply not appearing in a scene it was supposed to be in. For a moment, I thought ‘is Batman going insane? Is he talking to nobody?’, but when a second character began responding to the invisible person I realized it was actually a bug. It has only happened once, and was only active for one scene (a pretty important and emotionally resonant scene, mind you), and afterward the character was visible and able to be interacted with, but it’s just a shame a little more polish time wasn’t taken as it could have completely transformed the game into something far better.

While we are still talking about gameplay, let’s discuss the amount of content that is in the game. The main story is pretty lengthy, and does some awesome things with Gotham City – over the course of the game you will see the skyline of Gotham change multiple times, which is an incredible feat considering the size of the map. There are, in total, 14 side quests – most of which require multiple steps, though some require only one interaction, and others may require over 10.

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Are the side quests as good as in previous games? Not really. There are a few stand outs, the quest to catch a serial killer at large probably being the best one in my opinion, but most of them feel like open-world filler. I would have preferred less ‘destroy the mines around Gotham’ style missions, and more ‘investigate this crime scene and track down the killer’ style quests. But to me, the most glaring omission is the overall lack of challenge map content. Asylum, City and Origins all launched with more challenge content than the last, yet Knight has launched with the least amount of the entire series. While I feel that there was potentially too much content in Origins, I think City had the most balanced amount of content you could realistically get through. Not only that, but each challenge could be undertaken by any unlocked character – also not true in Knight. Some characters can’t even be used in the challenge maps, despite being in the main game, which is incredibly strange and, in my opinion, a really stupid oversight.

Challenge Maps have been confirmed to be in the Season Pass, but really, it’s pretty unacceptable to be expected to pay extra to play as characters that appear in the main game. Red Hood and Harley Quinn, I would understand, as they are already DLC characters, but why aren’t there any challenges for Robin or Catwoman?The music in the game is incredible, as it has been in the preceding titles. The satisfying instrumental score that serves as the backdrop to the game’s predator encounters is beautifully realized, and always kicks in and fades out at the right moments. Audio glitches aside, the game sounds great, with many hilarious lines of dialogue from random thugs and some truly great voice acting by some of the main characters – I still think the Riddler is one of the best voiced characters in video games.And now, we come to the story. For those of you who still wish to remain unspoiled, feel free to scroll down past the text below: I’ll leave spoilers out of the final paragraph where I’ll post up my final thoughts. For those of you who have finished the game, or just don’t care, read on.

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SPOILERS BELOW

I think, when compared to Arkham City, Knight’s story stands out in some ways as far better, and in some ways as far worse. The fact that it is centered mainly on 3 villains, with the occasional appearance by another being a short diversion, or serving to more fully flesh out those main 3, is a welcome change as it allows you to really focus your efforts on defeating these enemies and makes the main narrative thread far easier to follow.

This main story thread is certainly the most ambitious Rocksteady has attempted, particularly the areas where Gotham is bathed in fear gas, and you view it from both above and below the noxious cloud. This moment is amazing, as it shows you how serious Scarecrow is in his mission, when compared to the villains of the previous games who never really achieved anything quite as horrible. I found the ending that, essentially, all the mental and physical issues that Batman had been struggling through the entire game suddenly don’t matter and he can just will his way through them to be pretty disappointing. I’d just spent 20 hours watching Batman, little by little, eroded away in front of me, so for him to just decide that everything he feared no longer scared him was a bit of a cop out.

Moving on, the moment Barbara Gordon was killed off had a huge amount of emotional weight. Seeing Batman kneeling down before her corpse was striking, and set the tone for what I thought was to be a far more brutal game going forward. Instead, the story backpedals on this move a few hours later, showing that even in a self-contained comic book universe main characters will never die: Except for Joker, of course.

I can’t stress how great it was that Joker didn’t get magically revived somehow, though the concept that his blood is somehow infecting a few people – Batman included – slowly turning them into him is one of the goofier things I’ve ever seen. Some cool scenes came out of it, but ultimately it was a pretty stupid idea.

Where I believe the game has it’s biggest story misstep, however, is with the side quests. Considering there are so many opportunities to tell interesting stories about the other villains of Gotham who have apparently joined forces against the Batman (I can’t remember a single moment where this alliance was important or noticeable in the game), it is disappointing how the majority of these side missions play out. Most of them have to be unlocked organically across the city as you play, a great idea in theory that gets bogged down with you, realizing how hard it is to find a single building with a flaming bat atop it, or a random murder victim crucified on the side of a different one.

Penguin and Two Face have pretty meaty side quests, with one focusing on combat and the other stealth, but for some reason these super villains never collaborate. Why couldn’t there have been one side quest, where each stage jumps from combat to predator, and you are hunting down the united criminals and dealing with their combined forces? Instead, you get to hear them have a few lines of dialogue together after you’ve already brought them both to the GCPD, which essentially amounts too saying ‘I never should have trusted you’ to one another for the rest of time. A wasted opportunity, yes, but that is nothing compared to how disappointing Hush is.

In City, Hush was easily the most interesting part of the entire game: A maniacal serial killer who has stolen Bruce Wayne’s face in order to enact some kind of revenge against him? Awesome. Waiting years to find out what kind of huge plan he had in store was excruciating, and that it turned out to be ‘walk into Wayne Enterprises, beat up the CEO and take him hostage while trying to rob them’ is just… what? For someone who, in the comics, was a criminal mastermind to have a one part quest where you literally talk to him, and hit a single QTE was a terrible choice by Rocksteady, in my opinion.

One last thing: The Arkham Knight’s identity is telegraphed for hours before the reveal, which was a let down for me. I think Jason Todd is an awesome character, and would have been fine with the Knight being him, if only he didn’t take off his mask and then whine for the entirety of his ‘boss fight’, only to change his mind and not want to kill Batman anymore after an entire game where that is all he will talk about. Comic-book logic, I guess, but there are so many ways this character could have been handled better.

END OF SPOILERS

In the end, I really want to like Arkham Knight more than I do. It brings a lot of new things to the Arkhamverse, which is great, even when some of them don’t work 100% of the time. The overuse of tank battles in lieu of actual fist fights is frustrating, especially considering how polished the combat and predator sections of the game are. The lack of challenge maps sting right now, and I think it’s unfair to ask people to pay extra for something that has been a series staple until now.

However, there is a lot to like in this game, and after a few patches it’ll probably be even better. The combat is tight, soaring through Gotham feels fantastic, and hunting down criminals from atop a gargoyle is still one of my favourite things to do. It’s just a shame that between those parts there are many, many tank missions.

7/10

Note: Arkham Knight was reviewed based on a PSN code supplied by Warner Brothers

A Witcher Retrospective: It Started with Some Confusing Amnesia


The Witcher is a story, we’re all just lucky to be in it as it unfurls.

I remember I first installed The Witcher years ago because my old PC had crashed and burned due to my graphics card not handling the amazingness that was Skyrim. A good friend kindly donated an old gaming PC he no longer needed, and while it was capable of playing Skyrim, it had no wireless card and my Ethernet cable would have had to go through corridors, tables, people and walls to connect to our modem. I decided to wait a while and play the Witcher (which I had found in a sale bin) just to pass the time and do something different.

I have told you before that I am a narrative obsessed player. This was everything a narrative obsessed player could ever want.

The Witcher starts the game with a barely conscious and amnesiac Geralt of Rivia. As the player, you’re as confused about everything as he is. Where are you? Why are all these people talking to you as if you know everything? Why would anyone want to live in Kaer Mohren? Holy shit, what the hell is that monster? Where is my shirt? Why is that lady barely wearing any clothes?

It was a great introduction to a game that I utterly got absorbed in. The fighting mechanics were actually quite fun for me and as someone who LOVES using the pause button to stop and strategise, I rarely had time to think hard about decisions but was still given the flexibility to recoup and re-arm (or re-potion). The camera angling was actually fantastic, you have the option of top-down views or over the shoulder and mouse controls reconfigured depending on what you preferred. I used primarily a top-down angle which I think ultimately also affected my view of the story.

Camera angles are important, this top-down view let me see the world more broadly than just over the shoulder, which would have benefited me the views of seeing faces and having more intimate one on one interactions with people. The broader bird’s eye view let me see the towns in all their drudgery and glory, allowing me to see into every corner and know every person hidden within the shadows and without.

Geralt is really, really chatty. For a tall dark and brooding type, he actually, isn’t. This was utterly hilarious to be honest. Geralt’s voice actor has such a smooth and smoky mysterious voice that hearing it every ten seconds and hearing some of the silliest things said with it made me feel like maybe I didn’t get Geralt’s personality, or that maybe that amnesia gave him a personality transplant.

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For one thing, he is the world’s worst flirt.

Ok, he has the sexy voice, but holy cow are his pick-up lines the pits. Maybe the women of Temeria are desperate for a decent roll in the hay (seeing as most of the other male characters hanging about seem to be lacking in the initiative, manners, hygiene, looks and general competency department). Maybe they’ve all got poor hearing and poor taste because seeing Geralt get it on with women with the ever so lame ‘Hmmmmmm, I bet you’re a naughty girl’ (in the flattest deadpan tone) made me feel like whoever wrote these particular scenes has never ever tried even speaking to a woman.

Ah wait, here we go, the age old ‘video games are male sexual fantasies and not grounded in reality’ trope.

Considering how well written the game is overall, the whole collecting women like baseball cards was bizarre and confusing. If I were a bit more sensitive and had little less common sense about the video games industry; I’d have found it offensive.

Instead, I thought it was kinda sad and really pathetic. Here is Geralt, who is genuinely attractive, a great talker, good listener, good person all round and he just dips his wick where he finds it. I mean he doesn’t even have good taste, seriously, the banker wearing a wimple?! Seriously Geralt, how bad was that knock to your head?

I can understand the sizzling sexual tension between Triss and himself, after all, its based on history and her strangely low cut dress. And, if you end up choosing to shack up with Shani instead, you have a lovely relationship built upon respect, mutual admiration and dealing with PTSD that is usually attractive to those who like the hurt/comfort style of relationship narratives.

Geralt is genuinely nice. So the whole convincing a dryad to sleep with him on the grounds that copulation helps fertilise the soil (she outright rejects you if you say something as dumb as that) is just brain boggling and so out of place for a character who is a badass lone wolf mutant sex-god.

Of course its also offensive but I find the insult lands on both the women as well as Geralt as a character and it dismisses his personal integrity, especially since his heart genuinely belongs to Yennefer.

But the game still triumphs. The side quests are great to do and the skill tree progression is essential to your success. Every aspect to gaining knowledge, levelling up and equipping the right equipment make for a fantastic mix of strategy and action in combat scenes. The game makes you think two steps ahead and I utterly love that.

The difficulty doesn’t just lie in how fast you can click that mouse button, it lies in how well you can anticipate problems. How many times have I had to restart a fight because I either didn’t take the right potion or worse, the right combination of potions. How many oils can you put on your blade and which ones are efficient against wraiths. Can you survive on Cat and Swallow alone? Will the Falka’s blood upgrade be effective? What if I added a rune?

This was a real world, and it also had real problems. From the massive amounts of politics you eventually got involved in, like having to convince Foltest to relax prohibitions against non-humans, or choosing to support either Scoia’tael’s cause or the Order of the Flaming Rose (when you think about it, the word ‘Flaming’ was a dead giveaway for ‘repressed’).

And your decisions weren’t easy. I hated Yaevinn, he was smarmy, obtuse and generally unsympathetic even when Geralt agreed with him. On the other hand, Siegfried, a knight of the Flaming Order is so charismatic and friendly that I was amazed that he associated with such narrow minded, fanatical racist weirdos in dresses.

This is the beauty of the Witcher story. It has a narrative that you can read to your somewhat traumatised children that will actually leave them hanging on the edge of their seats. There is intrigue, will-they-wont-they romance and politics and twists everywhere. I remember a quest where I was tasked to find a den of prostitutes run by vampires, or demonesses, or something dangerous and sexy. It turned out one of the prostitutes had allowed herself to be turned and was actually enjoying her work because it provided more independence and freedom that the overbearing rule of her conservative, stuffy and all round tyrannical father. You make a decision; sleep with the ladies offering their goods, fight the ladies offering their goods, do both if you like, then rescue the unwilling daughter, kill the unwilling daughter, kill the unwilling daughter since you killed her co-workers anyway, or leave her alone.

While some of these micro decisions may not always affect the overall outcome of the story in a big way, it certainly did for my Geralt, especially as he began remembering things. Geralt struggles with the ideas that anything not human is considered aberrant, especially because he would be lumped in with that group. And yet, here he is ridding such aberrations from the world for the safety of petty humans who are nothing but narrow minded and racist.

One shocking scene is hearing little children gleefully cry out to kill the ‘squirrels’ (a withering nickname for the Scoia’tael, and more indirectly, a racist insult towards non-humans). That’s actually kinda freaky and it should elicit a feeling of shock and sadness.

The Witcher was a wonderful story, it was a good taste of a huge story where our decisions actually had massive consequences to the way we viewed the world.

And who knew! Them Flaming Rose Bastards are real Bastards!

I was actually surprised by the immense plot twist involving religious fanatics, a Scoia’tael incursion in a flaming battle-ridden city and the Wild Hunt. Yep, out of nowhere, the Wild Hunt, who we all know is the final (sort of) boss. I found it so easy to make quick work of him and all the end bosses but I think that was because the game mechanics were so ingrained in my brain at that point that I came into battle fully and utterly prepared for any kind of attack.

And with that, we shall leave off with a semi-colon to this retrospective as I next explore the LUSCIOUSNESS that is The Witcher 2 in my next instalment.

Until then, don’t let the Strigas bite!

Striga